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Humble Peasant Praying Statue

Peace & Wealth:

Far Cheaper

Than War 

Stained Glass Dove Of Peace With Halo

Short Version

War can’t win people’s hearts and minds. Instead, our wars and foreign interventions lead to more terrorist attacks. In 2000, there were less than 1,500 terrorist attacks worldwide. In 2013, there were nearly 10,000 of them. Most of them occur in places we’ve waged war or attacked with drones: Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Syria.

We’ve wasted tens of trillions of dollars in our wars for decades and contributed to the rise of militant jihadist groups like ISIS. With just fractions of this money, we could have given all our citizens free health care, free medicines, and free college and vocational education.

We could have used the money left over to end all hunger and poverty worldwide, give the world basic health care, and create a peaceful, prosperous earthly paradise. Poverty, suffering, and injustice are important causes of war and terrorism.

Helping poor nations would make us much safer. Imagine what would happen to ISIS and other jihadist groups if we fed the world’s hungry people and gave them clean water, basic medical care, and education. Experts say it would cost relatively little.

Isn’t it time to stop our incredibly wasteful, destructive wars and turn our beautiful, blue-green fragile world into a prosperous, peaceful paradise?

Peace & Wealth: Far Cheaper Than War (Full Text)

Army soldier and father Chris Walker stepped on a buried explosive and needed surgeries to amputate 3 limbs, rebuild eye muscles, remove shrapnel, restore his face, and treat a collapsed lung. He’s not alone—1,455 soldiers from our Iraq and Afghanistan wars had limbs amputated and 457 of them had multiple amputations.

We’ve lost nearly 6,900 soldiers and nearly 7,100 contractors in these wars and more than 700,000 veterans have become partially disabled. Iraq and Afghanistan have suffered far more, with as many as 1 million killed and over 6 million refugees who lost their homes.

War can’t win people’s hearts and minds. Instead, our wars and foreign interventions lead to more terrorist attacks. In 2000, there were less than 1,500 terrorist attacks worldwide. In 2013, there were nearly 10,000 of them. Most of them occur in places we’ve waged war or attacked with drones: Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Syria.

Even our Department of Defense admits many terrorist attacks are retaliation. The CIA admits its programs arming and training rebel groups have almost never succeeded. Al-Qaeda never existed in Iraq until after we invaded there.

We’ve wasted tens of trillions of dollars in our wars for decades and contributed to the rise of militant jihadist groups like ISIS. With just fractions of this money, we could have given all our citizens free health care, free medicines, and free college and vocational education. We could have used the money left over to end all hunger and poverty worldwide, give the world basic health care, and create a peaceful, prosperous earthly paradise.

Poverty, suffering, and injustice are important causes of war and terrorism. For example, only 27% of Afghans have access to safe drinking water and only 5% to adequate sanitation. In Iraq, 57% of those in rural areas have no access to safe drinking water. In Syria, drought has driven 2 to 3 million people into extreme poverty, with 80% of them eating mostly just bread and sugared tea. In Yemen, 78% of people now desperately need food, clean water, and medicines.

Helping poor nations would make us much safer. Imagine what would happen to ISIS and other jihadist groups if we fed the world’s hungry people and gave them clean water and basic medical care. We spend about $700 billion a year or $1.966 billion a day on the Pentagon’s military industrial complex. The Pentagon says it doesn’t need about 24% of its bases, buildings, and real estate, yet Congress won’t close them down.

President George W. Bush increased our military spending by about 75% and we are now spending 3 times as much on our military as we did in 1997. We could cut our military budget by 40% or $300 billion each year and still have as strong a military as we did under Presidents Eisenhower, G. H. W. Bush, Nixon, or Clinton.

Giving poor nations high-yield seeds and teaching them efficient irrigation and fertilizer techniques would at least double total food production yet only cost $10 billion, just over the cost of 5 and 1/4 days of our military spending. The UN estimated the cost of ending all world hunger to be $44 billion per year—a little over 22 and 1/3 days of our military spending.

According to the World Health Organization, we could provide access to clean drinking water to half the people worldwide who lack it for just $30 billion—just over 15 ¼ days of our military funding.

People farther from cities are harder to reach, but a new invention reduces the cost of clean water dramatically. We could simply give these people a newly developed book that filters polluted water. Each page costs just pennies and can kill harmful microorganisms to clean up to 100 liters of water.

According to 23 renowned experts published in leading medical journal The Lancet, for $70 billion each year—about 35 and 3/5 days of our military funding—we could provide basic health care to the whole world and dramatically lower diseases and deaths, saving 10 million lives a year.

We could build schools and give basic education to all the children in the poorest countries for $26 billion, less than 13 and 3/4 days of our military spending. This would save most of the 1.2 million children forced into prostitution and the 215 million children trapped in child labor, including 115 million doing hazardous work.

Helping poor nations would expand the world economy by including the 2 billion plus people who can’t really participate in it today, making the whole world stronger and more prosperous and bringing new markets to US businesses.

Many developing countries can already help and as the poorest nations grow, they will be able to pay for some of these public health measures themselves.

Worldwide, wars and conflicts cost about $14.3 trillion each year, 100 times more than rich countries spend helping poor countries develop. Wars disable and kill people, pollute the environment, and damage systems for health care, food, water, and sanitation.

Isn’t it time to stop our incredibly wasteful, destructive wars and turn our beautiful, blue-green fragile world into a prosperous, peaceful paradise?

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